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nickthejag

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Read the Ferris Conspiracy by Paul Ferris and Reg MacKay - prob a load of BS but a good waste of an afternoon nonetheless! Just started Booted and Suited - the Story of the 1970s by Chris Brown. Very interesting so far

Edited by spider jag

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Already read Farenhiet 451 and Clockwork Orange this month and currently starting on a Brave New World.

 

Aah - some belters - have to admit - not read BNW but its sittin in my wee book pile aside ma pit! Good schnitt! ;)

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The Beast, Paul Di'anno, the guys a nutter and every chapter is the same formula of sex, drugs, violence, and maybe the odd reference to being in a band, its no the dirt but a decent rock n roll tale of debauchery

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Just read and enjoyed;

 

A Boy's Story - Martin King

No Retreat: The secret War between Britain's Ant-Fascists and the Far Right - Dave Hann and Steve Tilzey

Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justufied Sineer - James Hogg

 

Currently getting stuck into;

 

Iggy pop: Open Up and Bleed - Paul Trynka

 

Absolute Rock n Roll lunacy and highly readable - Brilliant!

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I'm without a new book at the moment, so took to reading The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo from the other half's collection. Really not that interested in it, but I might finish it.

The first book in the trilogy is quite entertaining, but the second book is filler with inbelievable coincidences and it loses sight of the main protagonist for most of the plot, while the third makes you despair of what publishers accept as worthy of printing nowadays.

 

Just read and enjoyed....Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justufied Sineer - James Hogg

 

Is that possibly related to the Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner? :lol: I quite like the idea of a justified sneer, though, especially from such an inventive writer as Hogg.

 

I've almost finished "An Illustrated Short History of Progress" by Ronald Wright, a Canadian who makes you think about how grim the prospects for contemporary society really are, based on the experience of societies in history. Well worth reading.

 

Recently I finished "Infidel" by Ayaan Hirsi Ali, which I finished in two or three days because, although it's an autobiography, it reads like a novel. She was brought up initially in Somalia and eventually came to condemn the abuse of women's rights in particular among Muslims in the Netherlands. Her life has been threatened on numerous occasions, and she worked with Theo van Gogh, who was assassinated by an extremist Muslim for his part in the film that they made together.

 

My wife started reading what's known in English as "Alone in Berlin" by Hans Fallada, and recommended it to me. I've started reading it (in German, under its title of "Jeder stirbt für sich allein"), and I'm enjoying it too. It's based on ordinary people opposing the Nazis.

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Taken advantage of my time in France to read the following:

 

Dial M for Merde - Stephen Clarke: The 4th book in the 'Merde' series and as light heartedly entertaining as the previous 3. I can certainly relate to some of his experiences.

 

Renegade - Mark E. Smith: Been meaning to read this for years and I wasn't disappointed. Only thing was it was a little short at approx 250 pages. I thought he would have needed that much just to list the former members of The Fall.

 

Cowboys for Christ - Robin Hardy: Not a sequel to The Wicker Man (greates film of all time in my opinion) but a similar tale told in today's times. Absolutely superb and left me counting the days until the film version (The Wicker Tree) comes out. Whenever that may be...

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Is that possibly related to the Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner? :lol: I quite like the idea of a justified sneer, though, especially from such an inventive writer as Hogg.

 

 

My keyboards sh!te, OK?!! ;):P

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The Stuff of Thought - Language as a Window into Human Nature (Steven Pinker)

 

Deep, deep psycholinguistic analysis made surprisingly readable by the author. Got into this sort of stuff during one of the modules of a course I recently completed. The only thing is, you find yourself analysing the things people say for proof or otherwise of Pinker's theories, when you should just be having a normal conversation.

 

I'm probably messed up enough in the head to begin with, but, as Magnus Magnusson would've said: "I've started so I'll finish".

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Sid Vicious : No-one is Innocent by Alan Parker. Got it out the library to pass the time thinkin it would be just another trashy cash-in bio but was pleasantly surprised, really good, but brief, read.

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Sid Vicious : No-one is Innocent by Alan Parker. Got it out the library to pass the time thinkin it would be just another trashy cash-in bio but was pleasantly surprised, really good, but brief, read.

 

Portrait of an addict as a young man-Bill Clegg

 

fast easy and not a bad read

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Recently read both Brethren and Crusade, parts 1 and 2 of the Brethren trilogy by Robyn Young. It's a fiction about a Scottish Templar Knight based around the last years of the crusades. Cracks on at a fair old pace and very enjoyable - I generally like narrative history or books that marry enjoyable fiction with some historical accuracy and fact. Will be buying Requiem, the final book, presently.

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Reading "How to win at football boardroom politics" by Fergus McCann. It's a great read, especially the chapters on "Finding a scapegoat", "Using other people's money, not your own" and "Fans are generally stupid".

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George Galloway: "I'm not the Only One". The slightly one-sided rantings of Gorgeous George. He pulls no punches as he denounces the hypocrisy of the political elite. Blair, Bush and Co all get slated in equal measures. Plus the sainted Dr Reid even gets it in the neck as he sticks it to the man as only he can. As he famously quipped: "why should the Tories have all the good suits and cigars!"

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Cormac McCarthy's early novels, Child of God and Outer Dark, read one after the other. Stunning. Like looking at early sketches of his later, more expansive stuff. I know it sounds a bit wanky and luvvie, but if you want to read stuff that is jaw dropping, in terms of style and content, he's worth a look. He's the guy that wrote No Country for Old Men and The Road.

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May I suggest anything by Clive Cussler ........ Vixen 03, Deep Six, Night Train, Raise the Titanic (yes I know the film was crap, but the books good), all the way through to Sahara, (yip, film crap again, but the books good). There are plenty of other titles.

Its not essential to read them in order, but there are occassional references to the main characters previous adventures.

 

Or oldies, but goodies ....... the Sven Hassel books, well worth a read

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The Reluctant Fundamentalist by Moshin Hamid was a good easy read looking for something similar for my hols. Not easy to get a minute to read the complete works of Dostoesvy when you have a two year old!

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Since this thread was looking a little lonely....

 

Over the past 3 weeks I've read Fatherland, The White Tiger, a Brookmyre book (can't remember the title - to do with killer rubber ducks or something) and currently reading Lanark, which despite only being at chapter 4 I'm really enjoying.

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Since this thread was looking a little lonely....

 

Over the past 3 weeks I've read Fatherland, The White Tiger, a Brookmyre book (can't remember the title - to do with killer rubber ducks or something) and currently reading Lanark, which despite only being at chapter 4 I'm really enjoying.

Lanark is one that I've always thought about reading, but never quite found the time, blah blah.

 

"Twelve Books That Changed the World" by Melvyn Bragg certainly isn't one that I'd ever have put on my list to read, but I've just bought it on Robin's charity eBay site, so that'll be on the plane with me next week. It'll be gripping, I'm sure.

B)

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