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49 minutes ago, Charing X Jag said:

Glasgow charity cup I think it was called, but I was a wee boy when it stopped. Was defo decided on corners if a draw at full time.  Pretty sure they decided scottish cup replays the same way as well. Apart from that same format as the Glasgow cup. 

Thanks CXJ. Scottish Cup games traditionally played replays ad infinitum but perhaps there were occasions where a result was necessary? 

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4 hours ago, lady-isobel-barnett said:

Thanks CXJ. Scottish Cup games traditionally played replays ad infinitum but perhaps there were occasions where a result was necessary? 

Initially there was a rule in the Scottish Cup that if it was a draw after a replay then both sides progressed to the next round. There has never been a match in this tournament decided by corner kicks.

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9 hours ago, lady-isobel-barnett said:

One for the old timers, assistance required. I can mind some drawn Cup ties were settled on the higher number of corner kicks awarded. Not certain what competitions this applied to. Maybe it was just say the Glasgow Cup but may well have been other competitions. Also was this on 90 mins or after extra time pre penalty shoot outs?

Help.

M'lady, here's a list of 12 matches Thistle won or lost on corners.  They are all in the Glasgow Charity Cup except 11/9/1915 (Glasgow Cup). 

Third Lanark 1-1 (won 7-0) 24/5/1905

Rangers 0-0 (lost 3-8) 1/5/1912

Celtic 1-1 (lost 3-4) 5/5/1915

Clyde 1-1 AET (won 3-2) 11/9/1915

Clyde 2-2 AET (lost 7-8) 17/5/1919

Celtic 3-3 AET (lost 6-8) 2/5/1922

Queen's Park 1-1 AET (lost 6-7) 5/5/1923

Third Lanark 1-1 AET (won 3-0) 4/5/1927

Rangers 1-1 AET (lost 4-7) 5/5/1934

Queen's Park 2-2 (won 6-4) 5/5/1936

Queen's Park 1-1 (lost 4-5) 8/5/1937

Celtic 1-1 (lost 2-9) 5/5/1945

 

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I found this in the Guardian pages:-

[Also worth noting Rangers 'won' into the 67 ECWC Final in the basis of a tossed coin decision]

The most important coin-toss in the history of football came in the semi-finals of the tedious 1968 European Championships, Paul. Having drawn 0-0 with the Soviet Union, Italy (led by Internazionale defensive legend and crowd-pleaser extraordinaire Giacinto Facchetti) progressed to the final after winning a thrilling coin-toss.

Meanwhile Yugoslavia were dispatching England 1-0, thus ensuring they could be robbed in the final by the Italians. Trailing 1-0 with ten minutes left, Angelo Domenghini was allowed to take a free-kick with the Yugoslavs in the process of retreating the full 10 yards. Goal, and a 1-1 draw. Italy won the replay 2-0; not exciting.

 

The next biggest match decided by the flicking of a coin took place in the 1964-5 European Cup quarter-finals, after Liverpool and Cologne played out two dour 0-0 draws and then a 2-2 after a play-off in Amsterdam. Ron Yeats guessed right in the centre circle, as befitting a man who won more 50-50s than most. You'll Never Walk Cologne? Liverpool were then controversially dispatched 4-3 on aggregate in the semi-finals by Inter, led by that man Facchetti again.

But no hard-luck story is complete without Spain: they missed out on a place in the 1954 World Cup finals after beating Turkey in a two-legged qualifier 4-2 on aggregate. Sadly, aggregate scores counted for nothing in those days, and having won and lost a leg apiece, the teams played off. After the inevitable draw (2-2), it was down to a blind Italian boy to draw lots.

BOB WILSON

"My dad and grandad have been bickering over Bob Wilson," writes Elliot Townsend, surely the only person in history who has ever been able to say such a thing. "My dad says he played for Coventry city and then went to Arsenal and then became a commentator, but my grandad says that he only played for Arsenal."

Don't listen to your father, Elliot, as Fergal Sharkey nearly once sang. Bob Primrose Wilson qualified as a PE teacher at Loughborough College, but instead of doing what PE teachers do (shout loudly, look at lads cleansing themselves) he decided to join Arsenal instead. He played 308 games for Arsenal between 1963 and 1974, winning the Fairs Cup in 1970 and the League and Cup double in 1971. The only other team Chesterfield-born Bob played for was Scotland; he was never sent to Coventry once. Although what he was about to do would mean he should have been.

Primrose then joined the BBC in order to present Football Focus and ruin Saturday afternoons for everyone, before decamping to ITV and doing what was previously thought impossible; make the watching world pine for Matt Lorenzo. Still, he retired earlier this week, so let's spare a nanosecond to consider all the good things he's achieved in his time as a broadcaster.

DONE DONS

We mentioned that Hibernian were the first club to play in the European Cup in 1955. But Bert Megn wants to know why Hibs represented Scotland that year - and not 1954/5 League Champions Aberdeen?

Older readers may remember the original format of the European Cup, when it was: (a) good; (b) not seeded to benefit countries who generate large sums of TV revenue; (c) not filled with runners-up and the like; and (d) called the European Cup.

But surprisingly, the first season of this halcyon era was a bit of a stitch-up. Gabriele Hanot, the obligatory French visionary you need to start a football tournament, invited 16 sides to compete. And although Hibs hadn't won a brass bean since their last title in 1952, they were generally regarded as the best team in Scotland. What's more, they were the only team north of the border to have floodlights, a prerequisite for midweek fixtures.

The Hibees didn't disappoint, reaching the semi-finals when they lost to Raymond Kopa's Reims. Aberdeen must have been totally radged off; they didn't get to play in the tournament until 1980/1 (and soon wished they weren't as they were thrashed out of sight by Liverpool).

Interestingly enough, Hibs were one of eight teams entered in that year's tournament who were not champions of their national league, although at least eventual winners Real Madrid entered the cup as champions of Spain.

Edited by ARu-Strathbungo
fixed the text
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11 hours ago, ARu-Strathbungo said:

What's more, they were the only team north of the border to have floodlights, a prerequisite for midweek fixtures.

Not so. In fact as well educated people (Jags fans) know, the first European Cup game played in Glasgow was at Firhill in, I think, February 1956 when Swedish side Djuurgarden played their home game against Hibs - far too cold in Sweden at that time of year.

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1 hour ago, QXBoy said:

Not so. In fact as well educated people (Jags fans) know, the first European Cup game played in Glasgow was at Firhill in, I think, February 1956 when Swedish side Djuurgarden played their home game against Hibs - far too cold in Sweden at that time of year.

Back when Firhill was one of the best stadiums in Scottish senior football, at least according to what was considered acceptable back then.

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